Hailstone Urban Ginko, Kobe

東風の波埠頭の鉄鎖濡れそぼつ (誓子)
March waves
at the pier head
drenching iron chains   (Yamaguchi Seishi)

 

4th March, 2012. Nine Hailstones gathered one by one in front of Kobe Motomachi Station, where organizer, Akira Kibi greeted us. A raindrop – kigo of spring rain, implying stillness, suggestiveness – then, later on, an insistent pouring onto buds and flowers. With this rain, our ginko stroll took us from the Station, down to the port (Naka Pier), from where we took a cruise around the Harbor (altitude 0 m). On disembarking, we walked back up to Chinatown to have lunch. Afterwards, we wandered through the City heart, nicely recovered from the Quake Disaster of 1995, taking in an old Mosque, and on further uphill to the Kitano district and Ijin-kan Street (altitude 150 m), where Western-style buildings and former residences of early foreign settlers are preserved. We came back downhill later to a café to share our haiku. A few of our poems are below, though no one seems to have written down Emily Campbell’s verse.

Mount Rokko, still
and mist-enveloped:
remembering the Quake   (Lake)

Forlorn lamp posts –
the waves have lapped
a million times about them
since that Day   (Eiko) 

spring tide in the shipyard
soon, a vessel to be born   (Hisashi)

…….. from the harbour
…….. to the top of the hill
…….. walking with bravado –
…….. spring rain   (Mari)

By a red lamp post
Dumpling steam:
Poets
Sheltering in doorways   (Tito)

…….. spring rain
…….. wetting the mosque dome –
…….. its entrance, locked   (Akira)

Under spring drizzle …
the old foreigners’ quarter,
our port’s heritage, too   (Akito)

through rainy trees
a foreign house rots –
yet, its garden camellia!  (Shigeko)

4 Responses to “Hailstone Urban Ginko, Kobe”

  1. Sounds like a great ginko, which inspired some very nice ku.

  2. interesting. the different aspects of water in each of these poems.

    • Common denominator, nicely found, G! Yes, a wet day in a port brings out well the many manifestations of H2O…

  3. I am greatly impressed by the concise style of HIsashi’s introductory writing as well as the members’ poems that follow.

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