Atago Old Road Night-time Ginko

Four Hailstone poets, most notably Andres Matos (Amato’), visiting Kyoto for the first time in many years, set off on a rainy evening (24.8) towards Seiryoji Temple. There, we sheltered for a while under a great wooden gate waiting for the Jizo-bon lanterns to be lit along the narrow road that winds up through Saga towards Toriimoto and the foot of Mt. Atago. This old pilgrim route, would be decked out with paper illuminations for the weekend celebrating the festival of Jizo (Ksitigarbha), protector of children and travellers. Andres was passing through on his way from Venezuela to begin a new life with his family in Thailand. We walked and talked and wrote through everything from almost imperceptible drizzle to drenching downpours. A Hong Kong meal in Uzumasa’s Daiei Street rounded off the composition stroll.
.

Eight years gone by
without a haiku —
Where was I?

…………… (Amato’)

 

…………… Lamp-lit summer rain —
…………… Shadow of a pine-tree cast
…………… Across the temple wall

………………………… (Mayumi)

 

At odd intervals
lantern candles fizzling …
vanquished by the rain

……………  (Tito)

 

…………… Pouring rain —
…………… Just a few flickering lanterns lit
…………… for our flickering spirits

………………………… (Amato’)

 

After the rain
on Atago Furumichi,
candle scent

…………… (Haruka) 

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4 Responses to “Atago Old Road Night-time Ginko”

  1. bo lillesoe Says:

    Fine! Yours poetically, Bo Lille Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2014 03:43:54 +0000 To: bolille@hotmail.com

  2. Summer Words Stroll–found this post out strolling the internet. What a lovely picture you paint, of a “composition stroll”. This is a new idea to me–how does it work? Do you all pause together along the way and write a poem? Or wait and write around a meal at the end of your walk?

  3. What we do is to ramble loosely together (sometimes in conversation, sometimes 10-100 metres apart) and, when a poet has a poetic idea or image, perhaps jot it down in a notebook (or turn it over in the mind). At the end of the walk, we usually have time to have a drink or a bite together, and we might there tetatively ‘air’ some of our haiku, picking up reaction (and laughs). A week after the event, one of us will collect the best of the verse and sometimes post a short report (or work up a feature for a haiku journal). At the very least, we try to send participants a selection of what got down that day. The Japanese characters 吟行 (ginko) literally mean ‘go composing’ (or rather ‘composing go’). Hope this helps you, Puff.

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