Imashirozuka Hisashi Memorial

Ancient tumulus – / clay figures on parade / as memories return   (Akito Mori)

17 October, 2020, Settsu-Tonda, Osaka. 14 poets gathered for a haiku stroll and memorial event for Hisashi Miyazaki. It rained all day long. The ginko itself had originally been planned by Hisashi and Akito Mori, but with Hisashi’s sudden passing (from pneumonia), I (Akira) offered to help Akito, and we decided to go ahead, feeling that H. would have wanted that. We planned to stroll around the famous tumulus and later to commemorate our dear friend in his own neighborhood on the very day when his ashes were being interred by his family in a temple nearby (四十九日).

Haniwa carry his soul / into the celestial age – / a rainy autumn day   (Ayako Kurokawa)

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We began our stroll by visiting the Imashirozuka Ancient History Museum to orientate ourselves. The tumulus itself was constructed in the early Sixth Century and is believed to be the grave of Japan’s 26th emperor, Keitai*. It is a fine example of the large, keyhole-shaped moated tombs from the Kofun Period and is famous for its ceramic haniwa sculptures of soldiers, dancing women, wrestlers, animals, birds, houses and so forth.  The Museum has a fine collection of artifacts from the site.

black hole eyes / stare straight in front – / timeless haniwa   (Reiko Kuwahata)

Sacred maiden / praying with arms stretched out: / after fifteen centuries / headless   (Kyoko Nozaki)

the clay pot’s trumpet lip – / the ancients, too, adored / the morning glory!   (Richard Donovan)

Later that morning, we walked around the moat and some climbed through the autumnal woods onto the top of the colossal gravemound itself. Unusually, here it is permitted to do so. Lunch was taken nearby in a couple of local restaurants.

Haniwa ducks / stoic in the rain: / just arrived on the moat / their whistling cousins*   (Tito)

the bosky mound – / running down / its animal trails / autumn rainwater   (Mizuho Shibuya)

standing atop / an ancient emperor’s tomb / soft autumn rain   (Duro Jaiye)

We held our afternoon memorial meeting for Hisashi at the Community Centre, where we had reserved a room. The autumn rain continued to fall outside as we began with a minute’s silence, refreshing our memory of him. We then went round the table, with all participants managing to share a precious memory of H or to read aloud one of his haiku or haibun works. He was a multi-faceted person – poet, translator, editor, pharmacologist, climber, fisherman. We found in many of his haiku the scientist’s mind, aware both of minute details and of the larger processes at work in the history of the Earth and stars. One attendee affectionately mentioned H’s traits – both as a person and as a haiku poet – with the words ‘slowly, vaguely, smilingly’. With artful ambiguity (bokashi), he always managed to leave room for the reader’s imagination, so that we could better feel his poems and appreciate the meaning behind them. Other participants mentioned the ‘boyish twinkle in his eye’, his humour, and his enthusiasm for exploring new fields.

haniwa festival – / some are praying / that your next world / will also be amusing   (Teruko Yamamoto)

Towards the end of the meet, we were invited to share verses created during the morning’s ginko. Everyone struggled to spin the thread of time that has passed since the days of haniwa and kofun 1,500 years ago … and to weave that into the present moment through our haiku poems.

requiescat in pacem / beloved poet, Hisashi-san / Mr. Turtle   (Ursula Maierl)

Notes: *E. Keitai 継体天皇 (r. 507-531), whistling ducks = wigeon 緋鳥鴨

8 responses to “Imashirozuka Hisashi Memorial

    • Thanks for leaving your comment, Colin. Much appreciated. HM was an underrated, but truly great haiku poet, working in both languages.
      Through tinted grasses
      it zigzags to the summit —
      the autumn trail
      (Hisashi Miyazaki)

  1. It is sorry that I couldn’t attend Hisashi’s memorial event. But I could recall my memory about Hiasashi with this report. The theme of the ginko is well combined with the thought for Hisashi thanks to the great editing.
    Good bye, Kame-san.

  2. Thank you Akito for following through with you and Hisashi’s original plan to visit Imashirozuka. And thank you Akira for stepping in with your support on this occasion. It was a nice tribute to read Hisashi’s poems and discuss our relationships with him through his work.

  3. ‘When synchronicity is at play magic is afoot’… and this is true of the haiku memorial honouring Hisashi. He himself had begun planning the event of visiting the ‘haniwa’ (terracotta burial pieces) at Imashirozuka; on the day we gathered it gently rained all the day, setting a reflective tone; concurrently, nearby, Hisashi’s family was interring his ashes in a Buddhist ceremony. Gratitude to Akira, Akito & Stephen for following through on the event & sweet blog, and to our gathered members for honouring that laughing, good natured turtle of a poet, Hisashi-san.

  4. to Hisashi Miyazaki (Kame-san)

    Milky Katsura
    flows – so why such a hurry
    to Moon-crossing Bridge?
    – Dimitar Anakiev (Kame-san)

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