Archive for friendship

Onions

Posted in Haibun, Haiku, Tanka with tags on May 27, 2019 by Branko

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The Onion Field …………………………………………. by Dimitar Anakiev
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If you happen to be walking in the northern part of Kyoto, known as Kitayama, you may notice near the Botanical Gardens a middle-aged man watching over an onion field located right beside his house. His name is Branko Manojlovic, a Serbian poet who has been living in Kyoto for quite some time now. Although the onion is an essential part of Serbian culture – I can’t recall a dish that has no onions in it – these were planted not by Branko but by a nameless neighbour. Two years have already passed since the planting, yet the onion is still unharvested.

I, too, was taken with this field. During my stay in Branko’s house, I watched it every day from the window of my room: a field that through its very existence seemed to hint at something that, although not obvious, was at the same time significant.
Looking out of the window – the onion field still wet after rain – I wrote a haiku:

In its second year
onion languishing – who will
come and harvest it?

At breakfast, Branko looked moody and with dark bags under his eyes from lack of sleep. As I was stirring my tea with a questioning expression he swigged his coffee in a hurry and, before going off to work, handed me a folded piece of paper: “Last night’s haiku”, he said. After he left I opened the paper, it read:

Unable to get back
to sleep… the onion field
lashed by storm

I noticed that Branko had a special relationship with the onion field, but we did not discuss it. One afternoon I noticed him pacing about the field as though looking over each stem, each green leaf that was pointing toward the sky. The following morning, I got another piece of paper that read:

A group photograph:
we are the onions
hanging under eaves

I myself wrote haiku on the subject of onions, which seemed to have dominated our thoughts and emotions. On the other side of the street, where the bus no. 4 was passing, I noticed a small Shinto shrine set there perhaps because of some superstitious belief. Like some Christian chapels, such shrines would often have been established by local people, and this particular one was leaning against a neighbour’s house.
When I was leaving Kyoto, I left Branko this haiku:

In Kitayama
the onion field watched over
by some Shinto god

I do not know if this field still exists today. If by chance it does, I’ll bet Branko is keeping an eye on it.

 

 

Onions …………………………………………………………. by Branko

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Out of snow
green tails of onion stalks
slicing the wind

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How past repair
this aging onion field…
how the umbels
still hold on for bees
and swooping swallows!

*
By the field’s edge
he glances left and right,
uproots an onion,
stuffs it in the plastic bag
together with his conscience

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Sri Lanka – stolen flowers, dancing & worms

Posted in Haibun, Travel with tags , on May 25, 2016 by David Stormer Chigusa

We went to Sri Lanka last week for four days for a friend’s wedding. Everyone received a gift from the bride and groom, then the DJ got going – and so did the most dance-addled wedding crowd I’d ever had the gleeful privilege to be a part of.

Slights like
this smaller gift –
then dancing

We were taken around some of the sights on the island for a couple of days after the wedding, one of which was Danbulla Temple. We were all given a flower at the entrance to take up to the temple. Mine didn’t even make it halfway.

A flower for Buddha
Devoured in bliss
By a monkey

dambulla-monkey

Leaving, there was a brief, ostensibly routine, yet all-the-same extraordinary, pat-down at the airport that left me glazy and strangely elated.

Touched like that
at security
woke warm worms

No other words for it. (But, for a little context, may I add that friends were there, one of whom – from Brazil – is into gardening, for which he breeds worms: minhoca [mee-nyo-ka] in Portuguese.)

Toshi’s Commemoration

Posted in Autumn, Event report, Tribute with tags on December 8, 2015 by Ursula Maierl

………….. The autumn air resounds
………….. With girls’ cheerful voices –
………….. An old professor joins in                              Toshi

Commemorating our much-loved haijin, Toshi Ida, on November 22, 2015, a quartet of poets accepted a gracious invitation by Toshi’s life-partner, Michiko-san, to visit her home at Chitose-cho, Kameoka.  We shared an autumnal afternoon tea, with November-only ‘inoshishi mochi’ and home-grown persimmons. Michiko made Toshi’s ‘Hibikiai Forum English Haiku Poems’ class archives available to explore.  Yoshiharu presented a gift of a hand-made book featuring his calligraphy of many of Toshi’s haiku, while Keiko offered a hand-made wall hanging, in which to display individual card pages from the book. A white-and-purple bouquet was also presented on behalf of the Hailstone Circle.

In the early evening, rounding off our visit, we visited the local Daiizumo Jingu shrine, which was holding a festival under the rising moon.  The leaves were flaunting themselves, the weather was perfect: Toshi’s commemoration proved to be a delight.

 

A copse of maple trees –
the first anniversary
of Toshi’s passing ……………………………….. Yoshiharu

………….. carefully opening
………….. his cupped hands –
………….. a snow-midge
………….. floats aloft                               Ursula

shrine festival –
the man who got lost in the village
now tasting wine                                   Keiko

…………………………. The dozy red
…………………………. Of distant lit-up maples –
…………………………. Drums pound to the moon.                    Tito

Thames Way : Ulster Way (brown to blue)

Posted in Book, News, Walking with tags , , on September 21, 2015 by Tito
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Former Kyoto-based Hailstone, Diarmuid Fitzgerald, launches his first haiku and tanka collection the Irish Writers’ Centre, Parnell Square in Dublin from 7pm on 22 Oct. Anyone in the area is welcome to attend, but should contact Diarmuid first. The collection is based on a long-distance walk he made along the Thames Way in Southern England. Published by Alba (Kim Richardson).
…………………………. fields of barley
…………………………. shift of hue
…………………………. from yellow
…………………………. to brown
…………………………. clouds pass
………………………………… DF, on the …
Thames Way
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Icebox contributor, David McCullough, who has just begun a year’s sabbatical in his native Belfast, guided Tito recently along a stretch of the Ulster Way long-distance footpath in Antrim.
brown eyes of heifers
gazing at the ocean –
two jet trails
…….. DMcC, on the Ulster WayKC4F0045
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……….. On an offshore islet
……….. a man reclining
……….. in a brown coat –
……….. the seal!
………………. Tito, ditto
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Jade

Posted in Haipho, Haiqua, Travel with tags on April 11, 2015 by Tito
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Jade beads’
Condensed forest
Around her neck –
Hint of its birdsong.
(For Kazue, Yaoyue Teahouse, Maokong, 5.4.15)
KC4F0222
… click on the photo to enlarge and see the beads

The First Hailstone, Michio Sano, 1927-2014

Posted in Haiku, Tribute with tags , on December 17, 2014 by Tito

Early this year, Michio Sano of Yao, Osaka passed away and he is already greatly missed. He was one of my first haiku students (from 1996) and one of the strongest supporters at the inception of the Hailstone Haiku Circle in 2000. He co-edited the YBC haiku anthology, To Gigeiten. His grave is at Saishoji Temple in Ono, Fukui.

Firstly, then, let me share a few comments by his friends and admirers.

“I mourn for Sano-san. I was impressed with his tender-heartedness and his knowledge of ancient Japanese history.” (Keiko Yurugi)  “I imagine the excitement he must have felt composing haiku with and for an international group, not to mention giving his sensei from abroad insights that at those moments only he could do.” (John McAteer)  “宇宙をつかむかのような世界を表現するすてきなhaikuが多い … in many of his wonderful haiku he expressed a world in which it seems he has managed somehow to grasp space itself.” (Yoshiharu Kondo)  “Michio Sano’s news was very sad for me, too. I haven’t seen him for many years, but I still remember that he, Midori Inoue, Kei Goto and I sometimes used to go to a coffee shop after Gill-sensei’s lesson (at YBC in Namba). Michio 1It was great to make friends with a much older person.” (Mayumi Shigeta)  “He was a fine gentleman with wide knowledge. I pray for the peaceful repose of his soul.” (Hisashi Miyazaki)

And now, let us enjoy some of his English language haiku, the characteristics of which include humour, taking compositional risks, and an ability to juxtapose beautifully the present moment with a sense of history. Michio’s joy at working along the so-called ‘vertical axis’ is evident throughout.

Michio, for all you have taught me and given other poets along the way we walked together, thank you!

by a window ………………………….. Emperor Nintoku –
putting pampas grass ……………. at Mozuno, hunting pheasant
into a flask – …………………………. for his amusement
the agricultural lab

the great bare tree – ……………… the short night –
as if a net had been cast ……….. on and on and on I read
onto air …………………………………. ‘The Life of Kukai’

willow fluff snowing ……………….. long, long ago
to the beat of hooves …………….. an equestrian corps
……………………………………………….. had crossed these plains –
hailstorm … ……………………………. starlit night
to mountain village
decorated with frescoes …………  wind-pollinated
……………………………………………….. rice flowers –
gazing at the mountain …………. since Yayoi times
with its hidden story –
dusk cherry blossoms …………….. loquats ripening
………………………………………………… suggestively –
moonlit Lake Biwa ………………….. the statue of Artemis
has entered the rule …
of the White Emperor …………….. escaping
……………………………………………….. while describing a sine curve –
Xavier’s coffin …………………………. the earthworm
at rest on the hill:
Malacca Strait ………………………… wishing to add
in the haze …………………………….. to this painting by Munch
……………………………………………….. a red spider-lily

A Falcon’s Feather

Posted in Haiku, Haiqua, News with tags on November 29, 2014 by Tito
Dear Hisashi,
The more I think about it, the more amazing it was that I found a raptor’s feather in the shopping precinct at Senri Chuo just after delivering to you my tribute to the late lamented Michio Sano (‘The First Hailstone’) at the Yomiuri Bunka Center English Haiku class on Thursday. Wishful thinking, perhaps, but now I feel like it was some kind of final salute from him!
I had written the following haiku, based on something that had caught my eye on the way to the classroom in Oct. ’96 in Namba, Osaka, just before teaching Michio and the others my first real class for YBC …
…… For the haiku class:
…… Dropped and never picked up again,
…… One velvet button.
As you know, Michio had been both the cement and the oil of that class. In late November, eighteen years later, just after class no. 291, I picked up that dropped feather outside the new Center.
KC4F0063I believe it to be the foremost pinion of a falcon, as its underside matches nicely with the lead wing feather in this picture of a  ハヤブサ peregrine falcon, the fastest creature in the world.
hayabusa1I also carefully checked the internet for goshawk オオタカ, sparrow hawk ハイタカ and kite トビ feathers, but they did not match. Talking with you, and later doing a rigorous Japanese language web-search, shows that these birds are not uncommon in the area in winter.
What is uncommon is for a pinion feather to land in the shopping plaza and for a haiku poet from Britain to pick it up!
So I later wrote …
…… For our Michio prayers:
…… Dropped but then picked up again,
…… A falcon’s feather.
……………………………………………………………… Tito
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P.S. Another version (written on the night, unrelated to the Namba haiku):
…… After the memorial,
…… It dropped from the sky
…… To a shopping precinct —
…… A falcon’s feather.
The first version requires a haibun for its comprehension, whereas the second stands up on its own?