Archive for the Translation Category

When Tuna Die

Posted in Haibun, Japanese Modern, Translation with tags , on November 25, 2015 by Hisashi Miyazaki

Nenten Tsubo’uchi’s haiku group, Sendan, held a Japanese language haibun contest to run parallel with the Genjuan one earlier this year (Judges were NT, SHG, HM and two others). The winning piece, by Haruaki Kato, has now been translated into English by the author himself with help from SHG. We hope you will find reading this recent Japanese haibun both interesting and enjoyable.

 

…. “People say that tuna have to keep on swimming because they’d die if they stopped. I wonder what exactly happens, though, when a tuna dies of old age?” If my wife had not said this to me one day in a low, tired voice, I suppose I wouldn’t have thought about this issue so seriously.
…. We had just heard the news about the ‘mass death’ of tuna in a gigantic tank, the main feature of a famous aquarium. They were saying that the cause of death was still under investigation, and that a wide variety of hypotheses— including virus, stress, and even radioactivity— were flying about. For me, to be honest, the cause of the death didn’t really matter: I was shocked by the event itself. It was the simple realization that tuna die, just as we do, that had made me upset. I suppose the word ‘tuna’ had always conjured up to me either the image of a great shoal of them swimming freely across the ocean, or the vision of something being taken out of the freezer ready to be served as delicious sashimi. I had really never thought seriously about how fish passed away. And it was not only fish, but with any kind of wild animal, I’d always supposed they must die in a dramatic incident—being preyed on, perhaps, by a ferocious natural enemy or caught by a brave hunter or fisherman—just like I’d seen in art-house films.
…. Yet it is not like that at all. They might actually die, say, of liver disease, or of unfortunate food poisoning, or perhaps by bumping into a rock in an accident. It is simply the ego of humans, who desperately desire a peaceful ending of their own lives, to imagine other animals die in dramatic fashion. And it’s also true that most of us aren’t particularly concerned about the deaths of ordinary, inconspicuous creatures, for whom a dramatic end might seem rather out of place.
…. Death is all around us, and countless are the lives being lost at this very moment. The only way for us to survive in this world is to ignore such deaths, just as we do not consider the air as we breathe it in. Only occasionally might we bring to mind a highly dramatic or a deeply peaceful death and be moved thereby. This is rather like whales, still surfacing for air time and again, although their ancestors chose to give up the land for the ocean long ago. We need to think of death sometimes so as not to drown in life’s breathless waters.
…. Anyway, that is what I thought to myself as I stood there in a supermarket at the corner of the seafood counter, holding packed shelled oysters which were floating inside their sealed bag filled with water. The oysters appeared to me as if they might be enjoying zero gravity while refusing to ‘belong’ to either life or death. They seemed so calm in the airless tension.
…. When I looked up from my reverie, my wife was already in front of the meat counter far ahead. I put the packed spacewalking oysters back onto the counter, and weaved my way over to her through the crowds.

The oysters, too—
their spirits prepared
for whatever may come

The Banquet

Posted in Autumn, Haibun, Translation, Travel with tags on August 26, 2013 by Hisashi Miyazaki

A small restaurant on Ishigakijima known for its authentic Ryukyu Island cuisine. It’s right beside the sea. We enter.
Just beyond the entrance hall, a plump man sits on the floor plucking a sanshin banjo. He’s ready to play requests: either old or new Okinawan songs. The place serves up raw sashimi, as well as stewed, deep-fried and grilled fish. They also have noodles, tofu and chanpuru (a stir-fried concoction using bitter gourd).
Stewed pork, pig’s trotters, and pig’s ears follow. We are now quite full!
As night wears on and the customers soak up the alcohol, the staff take away all the paper doors dividing one table from another, and we find ourselves face to face with those we’ve never met, all singing along to the songs the sanshin player leads.
“Naki-nasa-iiii, warai-nasa-iiii; kawa wa nagarete…” (Cry, laugh; the river flows on…)
“Za-wawa, za-wawa…” (Sweetcorn leaves a-rustling…)
And there are old island tunes many of us have never learned.
Somewhat inebriated, we settle our account and duck out of the wooden door. Passing through a dusky grove near the house we emerge in the outer garden, where the lapping of the surf along the coral reef can just be heard. The heavens bristle with stars.

……… slow melody
……… of a sanshin banjo –
……… the Milky Way

.
(from ZIGZAG, Rengashobo-Shinsha Publishing, Tokyo, 2010; trans. into Eng. with help from SHG)

Warrior Grave

Posted in Haipho, Translation with tags on July 29, 2013 by Tito

RR Uaigh-JPEG

uaigh an ghaiscígh  … warrior grave

is gan éinne á cosaint … none to guard it

ach néalta fáin … but passing clouds

collaboration: Ron Rosenstock (photo)
& Gabriel Rosenstock (Gaelic/English haiku)

Translation Workshop

Posted in Summer, Translation, Workshopping on August 11, 2008 by Toshi

ふるさとに三日となりぬ葛の花
furusato ni mikka to narinu kudzu no hana

Three days have passed
At my dear old father’s house —
Kudzu vine blooms.

* kudzu vine: a climbing summer plant which is often found growing quickly along the Japanese riverbanks and fields with reddish-purple flowers

Hope any of you will put in some suggestions/corrections for my English version!

Easter hail

Posted in Spring, Submissions, Tanka, Translation on March 26, 2008 by Tito

At her homestay’s end
We hurry to the station
Under Easter hail:
A childless man together
With a fatherless daughter.

(Kamome, with own German translation)

Aufenthaltsende –
Durch grellen Osterhagel
Gehn wir zum Bahnhof:
Ein vaterloses Maedchen
Mit einem kindlosen Mann.